Thursday, September 10, 2009

Cornhole

Up until a few months ago, I had no clue as
to what this was, thanks Danny for
enlightening me to this one! Now it
seems that every where I turn I hear
about “playing cornhole”!

To enlighten me even more I took my
grandson, Caleb, to our regular
grandson/Nana/Kids Project Day at
Home Depot this past Saturday and they
made a mini one. I have blogged about the
Home Depot Kids Project before, this is
something that Home Depot does for kids
up to 12 years of age, 9 am to 12 pm. on the
first Saturday of every month. It is free and
it is so nice for the kids, it allows them to
get in there and make something with their
hands and they have such pride of doing that.

Anyway, as usual, I got off the subject,
Caleb made a mini cornhole board. These
boards are simple in construction basically.
In Caleb’s kit there was only 5 pieces that
he had to hammer together. The hole in the
main board was already cut. Two of the smaller
pieces that go under the main board are for
holding the corn filled bags that you use
for tossing. Caleb is great with a hammer
and in 5 minutes top we were out of there.
But look at the pride on his face with his
finished project! I love it!!



Now, for those of you who are so like me in
you quest to know more about this “cornhole”
craze….read on. Personally, I know that by the
time Caleb left my house on Sunday my right
arm was tired of tossing little bags at a hole in
a board and my dog was so tired of sitting
nicely by when all he wanted to do was chase
those bags and grab one and take off running!

Cornhole or Corn Toss is similar to horseshoes
except you use wooden boxes called cornhole
platforms or boards and corn bags instead of
horseshoes and metal stakes. Contestants take
turns pit ching their corn bags at the corn hole
boards or platforms until a contestant reaches
the score of 21 points. A corn bag in the hole
scores 3 points, while one on the platform
scores 1 point.

(from the internet)
Who knows the “real” history of Cornhole?
Let’s settle it here. Ok maybe not. The problem
is that there are many different versions of
the history of Cornhole. Most of the story
tellers of course, all believe they have the
real story. I guess the actual history will
probably remain a mystery. I’ve laid out the
versions that I have come across in my research,
and I’ll let you be the judge. If you have your
own version, please share it below. We would
love to hear any other stories that are out there.

CincinnatiCincinnati is the true origin of the
game. At least that is what you will hear if
your at a party in Porkapolis (a nick name
for Cincinnati). It may or may not be where
the game really started, but there aren’t many
that will argue its popularity around town.
It is estimated about 1999 that the game really
started catching on. It all started on the west
side of town. The story goes; from there it has
been working its way across the Midwest.

Foothills of KentuckyPioneers could have
played a version of the game in the foothills
of Kentucky. This would fit with the Midwestern
popularity as well. There are some that believe
that this is where it all started.

Midwestern FarmerThis story gives credit to a
Midwestern farmer named Jebediah Magillicutty.
It is said that Mr. Magillicutty started the game
back in the 1800’s.

German FarmerDid a German farmer bring
the game to this country? There are a number
of stories that confirm this version. This falls
in line with the Cincinnati story which may
give it some additional credibility. Cincinnati
is known for its strong German roots. It is very
likely that Germany could have been the actual
origin, with Cincinnati still taking credit for
starting the spread throughout the U.S.

Ancient CivilizationThe tribes of ancient
civilizations tossed rocks at holes in the ground.
This is yet another version of the ancient
beginnings of the game. This very well could
have be the first time something similar to
Cornhole was played. This one however,
seems to be a pretty far stretch from the game
as we know it today.

Thanks for stopping in and please feel free to
leave a comment so that I know you have
been here.
Pam

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